9 Java Error Code 1603 Fixes [SOLUTIONS]

If you’re getting “Error Code 1603: Java Update did not complete“, we’ve assembled a list of fixes below.

According to Java.com, this error, which occurs during the installation process, is indicating that the installation did not complete.

Java Error Code 1603 Solved

They claim that they’re still not entirely sure why this is occurring.

They also suggest 2 workaround fixes (Solution #1 & Solution #2) below.

Over in ProTechGuides, the blogger says it frequently occurs at the end of the installation wizard process. Whatever the case may be, check out some of our fixes below.

9 Error Code 1603 Java Fixes

Solution #1 (Restart & Uninstall)

  1. Reboot your computer before installing
  2. Once you come across the 1603 error, reboot your operating system.
  3. Download and install the offline installer package.
  4. When asked, select Save in the download dialog box, and save the download package in a convenient folder (perhaps the Desktop).
  5. Run the installation file to begin the setup process.
  6. Un-install Java versions before installing

*In the event the above instructions don’t solve the problem, it is suggested that you uninstall all existing Java versions from your system. And then restart the operating system after you uninstall all Java versions, prior to trying to install.

Solution #2 (Disable Java Content)

This method disables Java content in the internet browser before installing.

  1. Once you come across the 1603 error, shut the installer.
  2. Locate and in the Java Control Panel
  3. Uncheck (de-select) the Enable Java content in the browser option
  4. In the Java Control Panel, click on the Security tab.
  5. Uncheck the option Enable Java content in the browser.
  6. Select Apply and after that OK to verify the modifications.
  7. Reinstall Java and re-enable Java content within the browser
  8. Download and install the offline installer package.
  9. As soon as the installation has finished, re-enable the option to Enable Java content in the browser, should you require operating Java content in the browser.

Video Tutorial: how to fix “error 1603: A fatal error occurred during installation” error message

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Solution #3 (Delete Java Remnants)

Over in the SpiceWorks community, one Java user said that he’s been getting this Java error message whenever he tried to install Java 8u25.

He complained that the Java help center wasn’t providing any fixes, except advice to do a PDQ deploy.

One verified solution came from a user who said that he searched the C: drive and deleted all available Java results. And then he did the same thing in the registry. After that, he was able to download and then install the Java update.

Solution #4 (Task Manager Fix)

In the same SpiceWorks thread, a user posted the following fix

  1. download The offline installer
  2. run task manager
  3. End all Non-system processes and entire explorer Process tree
  4. Ctrl-Alt-Del and start The task manager Again
  5. Do A file\run and Initiate the offline installer
  6. Check If JAVA is Now installed And Working correctly

Solution #5 (An Oracle Fix)

Yet another SpiceWorks fix actually comes from Oracle:

  1. Navigate to Configure Java area in Windows
  2. Select the Security tab and then uncheck “Enable Java content in the browser”.
  3. Apply. 
  4. Then check the box for “Enable Java content in the browser”. Click apply.
  5. Close “Java Control Panel”.
  6. Retry the Java install.

Solution #6 (Antivirus Blockage)

Another user suggested evaluating your antivirus application. He noted that with McAfee VirusScan Enterprise, it employs a feature known as “Access Protection”.

Part of the Access Protection is an option to prevent the installation of browser helper objects and shell extensions. This is located within the “Common Standard Protection” category.

The poster explains that if this option is enabled, it will block Java installation.

Solution #7 (LogMeIn Conflict)

A subtle fix came from a user who said that his use of LogMeIn to work on end users’ workstations for manual Java installs was the problem. Once he installed Java without using LogMeIn, the installation worked!

Solution #8 (YouTube PDQ Fix)

The PDQ YouTube channel posted a video tutorial fix- they say it’s a very common Windows error. They say that 1603 refers to a fatal error that has occurred.

Solution #9 (Forgotten cmd.exe)

A user over in an Oracle thread said that he noticed that the evocation of cmd.exe was causing this error message.

The origin of the problem was a neglected AutoRun command specified in his Windows’ registry: HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Command Processor\AutoRunOnce he deleted this AutoRun entry, everything worked: 32bit, 64bit, jdk.

This happened on Win 8.1 but expected it would work on Windows 7 and 10.

What is Java?

The Rush Tech Support YouTube channel has a handy refresher if you don’t know what Java is. He explains that it’s a computer programming language that web developers use to help make applications and programs.

You can think of a program just like a book and as an author, the very first thing you have to do is determine what language you are going to write in.

The book in Java is merely another language to create the book in. And when you install Java on your desktop, it is fundamentally training your computer how to recognize that language and then, whenever you update Java, it’s a lot like educating the computer on new words in that language as well as updating security flaws as well.

Java is so commonly used online that it is nearly impossible to make do without it, particularly if you play games or anything like that.

He suggests having it and keeping it up to date. Then when you do end up requiring it, you already have it, and you know that there won’t be any security flaws and you definitely won’t be clicking on a fake pop-up.

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